Home     |     .Net Programming    |     cSharp Home    |     Sql Server Home    |     Javascript / Client Side Development     |     Ajax Programming

Ruby on Rails Development     |     Perl Programming     |     C Programming Language     |     C++ Programming     |     IT Jobs

Python Programming Language     |     Laptop Suggestions?    |     TCL Scripting     |     Fortran Programming     |     Scheme Programming Language


 
 
Cervo Technologies
The Right Source to Outsource

MS Dynamics CRM 3.0

C Programming Language

A good compiler please....


Can anyone suggest me a good, small, easy to use compiler which
follows ANSI C standards?

I use TurboC for the sole reason that I am quite used to it. It does
not follow some of the ANSI C standards.

Nikhil Bokare wrote:
> Can anyone suggest me a good, small, easy to use compiler which
> follows ANSI C standards?

> I use TurboC for the sole reason that I am quite used to it. It does
> not follow some of the ANSI C standards.

32 bit code generation:
http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~lcc-win32

compiler+ide+debugger+project management+
resource editor

Approx 5MB download

jacob

On May 31, 2:36 pm, Nikhil Bokare <nbok@gmail.com> wrote:

> Can anyone suggest me a good, small, easy to use compiler which
> follows ANSI C standards?

> I use TurboC for the sole reason that I am quite used to it. It does
> not follow some of the ANSI C standards.

see this could be useful to download. I don't know more about this
http://www.cs.princeton.edu/software/lcc/

Guru Jois wrote:
> On May 31, 2:36 pm, Nikhil Bokare <nbok@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Can anyone suggest me a good, small, easy to use compiler which
> > follows ANSI C standards?

> > I use TurboC for the sole reason that I am quite used to it. It does
> > not follow some of the ANSI C standards.

> see this could be useful to download. I don't know more about this
> http://www.cs.princeton.edu/software/lcc/

why lcc? why not gcc?
http://www.mingw.org/download.shtml
or here is a list
http://www.cpax.org.uk/prg/portable/c/resources.php#FreeCompilers

is lcc better in some way?

Yes. lcc is smaller, no installation problems, and it is a C compiler,
not a C++ compiler that can also compile C.

That is totally unfair.

Gcc is the Gnu Compiler Collection. Formally known as the Gnu C
Compiler.

The C front end to Gcc is just that -  a C front end.

On 31 Mai, 11:36, Nikhil Bokare <nbok@gmail.com> wrote:

> Can anyone suggest me a good, small, easy to use compiler which
> follows ANSI C standards?

> I use TurboC for the sole reason that I am quite used to it. It does
> not follow some of the ANSI C standards.

Turbo C was one of my first compilers too, and I did pick up some bad
habbits from it. I haven't used it for a very long time, but you could
check if you invoke it in ANSI mode or not.

A good C compiler is gcc, and if you start using lint too, you a lot
of warnings.

--
Tor

Tor Rustad <tor_rus@hotmail.com> writes:
> On 31 Mai, 11:36, Nikhil Bokare <nbok@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Can anyone suggest me a good, small, easy to use compiler which
>> follows ANSI C standards?

>> I use TurboC for the sole reason that I am quite used to it. It does
>> not follow some of the ANSI C standards.

> Turbo C was one of my first compilers too, and I did pick up some bad
> habbits from it. I haven't used it for a very long time, but you could
> check if you invoke it in ANSI mode or not.

> A good C compiler is gcc, and if you start using lint too, you a lot
> of warnings.

I dont know why but in Linux land "lint" seems to have all but
vanished. There is lclint but this is not in the standard Debian/Ubuntu
repositories.

The Gcc options -Wall and -pedantic can help a lot.

Although off topic, I would be interested to hear what other C
programmers here use for "lint"'like examination of theirs and others
code.

On 31 Mai, 15:28, Richard <rgr@gmail.com> wrote:

> Tor Rustad <tor_rus@hotmail.com> writes:

<snip>

> > A good C compiler is gcc, and if you start using lint too, you get
> > a lot of warnings.

> I dont know why but in Linux land "lint" seems to have all but
> vanished. There is lclint but this is not in the standard Debian/Ubuntu
> repositories.

> The Gcc options -Wall and -pedantic can help a lot.

and -ansi

> Although off topic, I would be interested to hear what other C
> programmers here use for "lint"'like examination of theirs and others
> code.

I use splint myself, which available both on Win32 and Linux.

http://www.splint.org/

on Ubuntu just type

sudo apt-get install splint

--
Tor

On Thu, 31 May 2007 15:28:46 +0200, Richard <rgr@gmail.com> wrote
in comp.lang.c:

PC Lint http://www.gimpel.com

A commercial product, but very reasonably priced for what it does.

I haven't tried splint, so I don't know if it is as good.

Anyone who makes a living programming in C who does not use a lint, or
one of the more advanced and really expensive static analysis tools on
the market, only thinks he/she is a professional programmer.

--
Jack Klein
Home: http://JK-Technology.Com
FAQs for
comp.lang.c http://c-faq.com/
comp.lang.c++ http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/
alt.comp.lang.learn.c-c++
http://www.club.cc.cmu.edu/~ajo/docs/FAQ-acllc.html

On Jun 1, 4:32 am, Jack Klein <jackkl@spamcop.net> wrote:

> Anyone who makes a living programming in C who does not use alint, or
> one of the more advanced and really expensive static analysis tools on
> the market, only thinks he/she is a professional programmer.

I have to say I disagree with this. I think lint really blows :(

My compiler is already extremely picky with -W -ansi -pedantic, but
with lint you get screen after screen of spurious warnings even for a
100-line toy program. Sorting out all the cruft from the lint output
for a production-sized program would be an inconceivable burden.

On May 31, 2:36 pm, Nikhil Bokare <nbok@gmail.com> wrote:

> Can anyone suggest me a good, small, easy to use compiler which
> follows ANSI C standards?

> I use TurboC for the sole reason that I am quite used to it. It does
> not follow some of the ANSI C standards.

I think Dev C++ IDE with Cygwin(gcc) compiler would fit your
requirement.
You can find link to this and other compilers at:
http://prokutfaq.byethost15.com/FreeCompilers

-Sharath

On Jun 1, 2:08 pm, Sharath <avshar@gmail.com> wrote:

> On May 31, 2:36 pm, Nikhil Bokare <nbok@gmail.com> wrote:

> > Can anyone suggest me a good, small, easy to use compiler which
> > follows ANSI C standards?

> > I use TurboC for the sole reason that I am quite used to it. It does
> > not follow some of the ANSI C standards.

> I think Dev C++ IDE with Cygwin(gcc) compiler would fit your
> requirement.

I mean Dev C++ IDE with MinGW(gcc) compiler. I got confused with
Cygwin and MinGW, anyway both of them are configurable with Dev C++.

Sharath wrote:
> On May 31, 2:36 pm, Nikhil Bokare <nbok@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Can anyone suggest me a good, small, easy to use compiler which
>> follows ANSI C standards?

>> I use TurboC for the sole reason that I am quite used to it. It does
>> not follow some of the ANSI C standards.

> I think Dev C++ IDE with Cygwin(gcc) compiler would fit your
> requirement.
> You can find link to this and other compilers at:
> http://prokutfaq.byethost15.com/FreeCompilers

> -Sharath

The original poster was asking for a C ide, not a C++ IDE

"jacob navia" writes:
> Sharath wrote:
>> On May 31, 2:36 pm, Nikhil Bokare <nbok@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> Can anyone suggest me a good, small, easy to use compiler which
>>> follows ANSI C standards?

>>> I use TurboC for the sole reason that I am quite used to it. It does
>>> not follow some of the ANSI C standards.

>> I think Dev C++ IDE with Cygwin(gcc) compiler would fit your
>> requirement.
>> You can find link to this and other compilers at:
>> http://prokutfaq.byethost15.com/FreeCompilers
> The original poster was asking for a C ide, not a C++ IDE

Then for DevC the OP must type a file name of the form xxx.c when he creates
a new ffile.  Appending ".c" makes it a C compiler.

Francine.Ne@googlemail.com wrote:
> Jack Klein <jackkl@spamcop.net> wrote:

>> Anyone who makes a living programming in C who does not use alint,
>> or one of the more advanced and really expensive static analysis
>> tools on the market, only thinks he/she is a professional
>> programmer.

> I have to say I disagree with this. I think lint really blows :(

> My compiler is already extremely picky with -W -ansi -pedantic,
> but with lint you get screen after screen of spurious warnings
> even for a 100-line toy program. Sorting out all the cruft from
> the lint output for a production-sized program would be an
> inconceivable burden.

What happened to -Wall, not to mention some others.

--
 <http://www.cs.auckland.ac.nz/~pgut001/pubs/vista_cost.txt>
 <http://www.securityfocus.com/columnists/423>
 <http://www.aaxnet.com/editor/edit043.html>
 <http://kadaitcha.cx/vista/dogsbreakfast/index.html>
                        cbfalconer at maineline dot net

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

On Jun 1, 5:43 pm, jacob navia <j@jacob.remcomp.fr> wrote:

> Sharath wrote:
> > I think Dev C++ IDE with Cygwin(gcc) compiler would fit your
> > requirement.
> > You can find link to this and other compilers at:
> >http://prokutfaq.byethost15.com/FreeCompilers

> The original poster was asking for a C ide, not a C++ IDE

No. He asked for a C compiler, not IDE. I suggested
Dev C++ IDE with MinGW compiler(which is a gcc port to
Windows and has both C and C++ compilers). And Dev C++
is an IDE for both C and C++.

-Sharath

He asked for "easy to use" and compared with turbo C which kind of hints
at an IDE too. You could do a lot worse than Eclipse with the CDT plugin
for a C IDE which in turn uses gcc as a compiler backend. It has very
good Intellisense like functionality and code cross referencing.

Ideal for a beginner.

Eclipse "know how" is never a bad thing to have. Yes, its a bit on the
"heavy" side, but all (spit) Java apps are ...

Francine.Ne@googlemail.com wrote:
> On Jun 1, 4:32 am, Jack Klein <jackkl@spamcop.net> wrote:
>> Anyone who makes a living programming in C who does not use alint, or
>> one of the more advanced and really expensive static analysis tools on
>> the market, only thinks he/she is a professional programmer.

> I have to say I disagree with this. I think lint really blows :(

> My compiler is already extremely picky with -W -ansi -pedantic, but
> with lint you get screen after screen of spurious warnings even for a
> 100-line toy program. Sorting out all the cruft from the lint output
> for a production-sized program would be an inconceivable burden.

I don't get screen after screen with lint warnings....

If Sun can keep a kernel lint clean, then you can do the same:

19. You have the following additional responsibilities when integrating
changes to
    the kernel:

     o Your changes must not introduce any lint errors.  See tips on keeping
       the kernel lint clean at /shared/ON/general_docs/lint_tips.txt.

     o For the kernel, changes must conform to the C coding style.

http://www.opensolaris.org/os/project/muskoka/on_dev/golden_rules.txt

--
Tor <torust [at] online [dot] no>

On Jun 1, 7:46 pm, Sharath <avshar@gmail.com> wrote:

Thanks for all the help.
I would also like to have an IDE.
But the basic requirement is it should work perfectly according to
ANSI standards in WindowsXP environtment.
Nikhil Bokare wrote, On 03/06/07 09:30:

If you use the correct options (-ansi -pedantic) all of the gcc based
systems above will conform to the C89 standard and I believe they will
all run on Windows XP.

You could also look at these pages
http://clc-wiki.net/wiki/C_resources:Compilers
http://clc-wiki.net/wiki/C_resources:IDEs
--
Flash Gordon

Add to del.icio.us | Digg this | Stumble it | Powered by Megasolutions Inc