Home     |     .Net Programming    |     cSharp Home    |     Sql Server Home    |     Javascript / Client Side Development     |     Ajax Programming

Ruby on Rails Development     |     Perl Programming     |     C Programming Language     |     C++ Programming     |     IT Jobs

Python Programming Language     |     Laptop Suggestions?    |     TCL Scripting     |     Fortran Programming     |     Scheme Programming Language


 
 
Cervo Technologies
The Right Source to Outsource

MS Dynamics CRM 3.0

C Programming Language

C


Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queris que sea
On Jun 4, 2:14 pm, "cesarcp" <cesa@mundo-r.com> wrote:

> Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queris que sea

Please use statdard US English with is global language.
Your ^&$&*($&*&%(_+ is not understandable to us.

Bye

In article <1181036351.190951.208@i13g2000prf.googlegroups.com>, Guru
Jois <guru.j@gmail.com> writes

>On Jun 4, 2:14 pm, "cesarcp" <cesa@mundo-r.com> wrote:
>> Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queris que sea

>Please use statdard US English with is global language

No it is NOT. US English is used in the US.  There are  in fact 6
version of English in use in the world.  British English being the most
widely used.

>Your ^&$&*($&*&%(_+ is not understandable to us.
>Bye

Not at all.... it is not understood by YOU which is not the same.

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England     /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ c@phaedsys.org      www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

"Chris Hills" writes:
> In article <1181036351.190951.208@i13g2000prf.googlegroups.com>, Guru
> Jois <guru.j@gmail.com> writes
>>On Jun 4, 2:14 pm, "cesarcp" <cesa@mundo-r.com> wrote:
>>> Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queris que sea

>>Please use statdard US English with is global language

> No it is NOT. US English is used in the US.  There are  in fact 6 version
> of English in use in the world.  British English being the most widely
> used.

I think he meant to say

 "Please use [standard] US English [which] is [a] global language."

Chris Hills said:

> In article <1181036351.190951.208@i13g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
> Guru Jois <guru.j@gmail.com> writes
>>On Jun 4, 2:14 pm, "cesarcp" <cesa@mundo-r.com> wrote:
>>> Eso no va a ser lo que algunos de vosotros.as queris que sea

>>Please use statdard US English with is global language

> No it is NOT. US English is used in the US.  There are  in fact 6
> version of English in use in the world.

6, for certain values of 6.

BBC English, Zummerzet, Scouse, Geordie, Black Country, Yorkshire
(except Sheffield), Sheffield, to name but seven. I'm sure there are
plenty more where those came from (or rather, from other places
nearby).

> British English being the most widely used.

We don't put our name on our stamps. I see no reason why we need to
qualify the name of our language, especially since the name is
/already/ there. You wouldn't catch the Spaniards saying "Iberian
Spanish" or the Italians saying "Mediterranean Italian".

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.

In article <1181036351.190951.208@i13g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
Guru Jois  <guru.j@gmail.com> wrote:

>Please use statdard US English with is global language.

Is this irony?

-- Richard
--
"Consideration shall be given to the need for as many as 32 characters
in some alphabets" - X3.4, 1963.

Richard Tobin wrote:
> In article <1181036351.190951.208@i13g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
> Guru Jois  <guru.j@gmail.com> wrote:
>> Please use statdard US English with is global language.

> Is this irony?

> -- Richard

No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.
jacob navia said:

> Richard Tobin wrote:
>> In article <1181036351.190951.208@i13g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
>> Guru Jois  <guru.j@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> Please use statdard US English with is global language.

>> Is this irony?

> No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.

Yes, but then many U.S. citizens also believe that Elvis lives, that
Nixon was framed, and that the edges of the world are called Florida,
California, and Canada.

--
Richard Heathfield
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29/7/1999
http://www.cpax.org.uk
email: rjh at the above domain, - www.

In article <jqidne5ceLN0xvjbnZ2dnUVZ8q7in@bt.com>,
Richard Heathfield  <r@see.sig.invalid> wrote:

>jacob navia said:

>> Richard Tobin wrote:
>>> In article <1181036351.190951.208@i13g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
>>> Guru Jois  <guru.j@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> Please use statdard US English with is global language.

>>> Is this irony?

>> No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.

>Yes, but then many U.S. citizens also believe that Elvis lives, that
>Nixon was framed, and that the edges of the world are called Florida,
>California, and Canada.

44% of Americans believe that Jesus is coming back to Earth sometime in
the next 50 years.  Half of them are absolutely certain of this; the
other half only "pretty sure".
In article <14GdndTaqfxGyvjbRVny@bt.com>, Richard Heathfield
<r@see.sig.invalid> writes

I was told there are officially 6 official versions of English by a
Proff of English (an American teaching in Spain :-) Within each version
there are many dialects.

>> British English being the most widely used.

>We don't put our name on our stamps. I see no reason why we need to
>qualify the name of our language, especially since the name is
>/already/ there. You wouldn't catch the Spaniards saying "Iberian
>Spanish"

It is not Iberian Spanish but Castillian Spanish.. As opposed to the
other versions used in Spain  There is Spanish and Spanish

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England     /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ c@phaedsys.org      www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

In article <46655aef$0$5068$ba4ac@news.orange.fr>, jacob navia
<j@jacob.remcomp.fr> writes

>Richard Tobin wrote:
>> In article <1181036351.190951.208@i13g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
>> Guru Jois  <guru.j@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> Please use statdard US English with is global language.
>>  Is this irony?
>>  -- Richard

>No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.

Not the first time the US population has been wrong...

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England     /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ c@phaedsys.org      www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

jacob navia <j@jacob.remcomp.fr> writes:
> Richard Tobin wrote:
>> In article <1181036351.190951.208@i13g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
>> Guru Jois  <guru.j@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> Please use statdard US English with is global language.

>> Is this irony?

>> -- Richard

> No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.

No. That is  a "whoosh" :)
In article <jqidne5ceLN0xvjbnZ2dnUVZ8q7in@bt.com>, Richard Heathfield
<r@see.sig.invalid> writes
>jacob navia said:

>> Richard Tobin wrote:
>>> In article <1181036351.190951.208@i13g2000prf.googlegroups.com>,
>>> Guru Jois  <guru.j@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>> Please use statdard US English with is global language.

>>> Is this irony?

>> No, it is what many U.S. citizens actually believe.

>Yes, but then many U.S. citizens also believe that Elvis lives,

True (works with James Dean in the CIA)

> that
>Nixon was framed,

He was by Elvis and James Dean working for the CIA....

>and that the edges of the world are called Florida,
>California, and Canada.

I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US and
Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world cried
foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and Canada who
said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England     /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ c@phaedsys.org      www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

Chris Hills wrote:
> I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US and
> Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world cried
> foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and Canada who
> said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)

If a political firestorm sweeps here subsequently, I shall be looking to
/you/ as the person with the match, smiley or no ifing smiley.

--
"If there is a problem, you must confess it, Mr Chaplin"/The Beiderbeck Affair/

Hewlett-Packard Limited registered office:                Cain Road, Bracknell,
registered no: 690597 England                                    Berks RG12 1HN

Chris Hills wrote, On 05/06/07 14:06:

> In article <jqidne5ceLN0xvjbnZ2dnUVZ8q7in@bt.com>, Richard Heathfield

<snip>

>> and that the edges of the world are called Florida,
>> California, and Canada.

> I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US and
> Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world cried
> foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and Canada who
> said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)

The Scottish already have one, it just needs repairing. Admittedly the
border has moved since it was built.
--
Flash Gordon
In article <ch8gj4xrd1.@news.flash-gordon.me.uk>,
Flash Gordon  <s@flash-gordon.me.uk> wrote:

>The Scottish already have one, it just needs repairing. Admittedly the
>border has moved since it was built.

We have two; the current border is between them.

The less well-known is the Antonine Wall, see

  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonine_Wall

-- Richard
--
"Consideration shall be given to the need for as many as 32 characters
in some alphabets" - X3.4, 1963.

In article <ch8gj4xrd1.@news.flash-gordon.me.uk>, Flash Gordon
<s@flash-gordon.me.uk> writes

>Chris Hills wrote, On 05/06/07 14:06:
>> In article <jqidne5ceLN0xvjbnZ2dnUVZ8q7in@bt.com>, Richard
>>Heathfield

><snip>

>>> and that the edges of the world are called Florida,
>>> California, and Canada.
>>  I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US
>>and Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world
>>cried foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and
>>Canada who said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)

>The Scottish already have one, it just needs repairing. Admittedly the
>border has moved since it was built.

I would repair both.... Hadrians and Antoine's and make it a free fire
zone in between.

We can play foot ball between the two at Christmas :-)

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England     /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ c@phaedsys.org      www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

In article <f43s3m$a9@murdoch.hpl.hp.com>, Chris Dollin
<chris.dol@hp.com> writes

>Chris Hills wrote:

>> I note that when the US said it was building a wall between the US and
>> Mexico to keep the serving classes in their place the whole world cried
>> foul except Isreal who is building its own (illegal) wall and Canada who
>> said Every country should have a wall on it's Southern border :-)

>If a political firestorm sweeps here subsequently, I shall be looking to
>/you/ as the person with the match, smiley or no ifing smiley.

Well the Canadians said it with a smile and then thought again.....
apparently they have started surveying :-)

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England     /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ c@phaedsys.org      www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

In article <f43tpa$19v@pc-news.cogsci.ed.ac.uk>, Richard Tobin
<rich@cogsci.ed.ac.uk> writes

>In article <ch8gj4xrd1.@news.flash-gordon.me.uk>,
>Flash Gordon  <s@flash-gordon.me.uk> wrote:
>>The Scottish already have one, it just needs repairing. Admittedly the
>>border has moved since it was built.

>We have two; the current border is between them.

>The less well-known is the Antonine Wall, see

>  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonine_Wall

>-- Richard

See my other post for suggestions of the border :-)

It is interesting that BOTH sides  equally argue for extending it or
removing it as a border....

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England     /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ c@phaedsys.org      www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

"Chris Hills" writes:
> No it is NOT. US English is used in the US.  There are  in fact 6 version
> of English in use in the world.  British English being the most widely
> used.

I can't help noticing that British English likes to name things for what
they are not, rather than what they are.  For example, "wireless" and
"horseless carriage".  If they had been put in charge I expect we would be
talking about "gearless calculators" instead of computers.

I wonder what the six varieties of English are.  I come up with:

British English
Indian English
Australian English
US English
Canadian English.

But I can't come up with a sixth. I would be comfortable if US and Canadian
were lumped into "North American English" if someone can come up with two
varieties not mentioned above.

In article <14GdndTaqfxGyvjbRVny@bt.com>,
Richard Heathfield  <r@see.sig.invalid> wrote:

>Chris Hills said:
>> British English being the most widely used.

>We don't put our name on our stamps. I see no reason why we need to
>qualify the name of our language, especially since the name is
>/already/ there. You wouldn't catch the Spaniards saying "Iberian
>Spanish" or the Italians saying "Mediterranean Italian".

English (the language) is used widely enough, and exists in enough
different dialects, that a qualifier specifying which of those dialects
is being referred to is probably appropriate, even for English (the
nationality) English (the language) speakers.

Referring to the different variations as "American", "Australian",
"British", "Canadian", and "International" (and also a few that I'm
missing), without using "English" to identify the language group,
is probably also inappropriate - the various dialects haven't really
diverged enough to be considered different languages.

(Unless, of course, you're going to use the definition of "language" as
"a dialect with an army"; by that definition most of them are...)

dave

--
Dave Vandervies                                    dj3va@csclub.uwaterloo.ca
In fact, I go to considerable lengths to maintain the self-imposed delusion
that I live in a fantasy world, one in which software is easy and fun to write,
and works right the first time                    --Steve Summit in comp.lang.c

"osmium" <r124c4u@comcast.net> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:5cle9vF2vpu66U1@mid.individual.net...

The Canadians probably object to that...

Bye, Jojo

In article <f44054$vr@online.de>,

Well, obviously.

There's probably at least as much variation within both languages
as there is between them, but I've been told that it's quite easy to
classify North-Americans into Canadians and Americans based mostly on
their language.

dave
(probably couldn't do it myself, though)

--
Dave Vandervies                                    dj3va@csclub.uwaterloo.ca
In fact, I go to considerable lengths to maintain the self-imposed delusion
that I live in a fantasy world, one in which software is easy and fun to write,
and works right the first time                    --Steve Summit in comp.lang.c

In article <5cle9vF2vpu6@mid.individual.net>, osmium
<r124c4u@comcast.net> writes

South African

I am not sure if Canadian and US were lumped together.

--
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\
\/\/\/\/\ Chris Hills  Staffs  England     /\/\/\/\/
/\/\/ c@phaedsys.org      www.phaedsys.org \/\/\
\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

"Dave Vandervies" <dj3va@csclub.uwaterloo.ca> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:f440ep$f64$1@rumours.uwaterloo.ca...

Esp. if they are Franco-Canadians 8-)

> (probably couldn't do it myself, though)

Easy: let them spell wiskey or colour. As far as I know Canadians spell it
the British way.

Hold on: you should know, posting from a Canadain account, shouldn't you?

Add to del.icio.us | Digg this | Stumble it | Powered by Megasolutions Inc