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Convert milliseconds after midnight January 1, 1970 GMT to formatted time


What is the best method to convert milliseconds (after midnight
January 1, 1970 GMT) to formatted time

example:
972798180000 ==> 10/18/2000 14:08:11

vunet@gmail.com wrote:
> What is the best method to convert milliseconds (after midnight
> January 1, 1970 GMT) to formatted time

> example:
> 972798180000 ==> 10/18/2000 14:08:11

new Date(972798180000).toLocaleString()

or in case you need that specific format: use the varius
getMonth/getDate/getFullYear, etc. and compose the needed string out of
this values.

reagards,
Torsten

On May 21, 12:19 pm, Torsten Robitzki <MyFirstn@Robitzki.de> wrote:

> vunet@gmail.com wrote:
> > What is the best method to convert milliseconds (after midnight
> > January 1, 1970 GMT) to formatted time

> > example:
> > 972798180000 ==> 10/18/2000 14:08:11

> new Date(972798180000).toLocaleString()

> or in case you need that specific format: use the varius
> getMonth/getDate/getFullYear, etc. and compose the needed string out of
> this values.

> reagards,
> Torsten

thanks
In comp.lang.javascript message <1179763357.335087.148@r3g2000prh.goo
glegroups.com>, Mon, 21 May 2007 09:02:37, vunet@gmail.com posted:

>What is the best method to convert milliseconds (after midnight
>January 1, 1970 GMT) to formatted time

Conventionally, midnight is the end of the day.  You mean 1970-01-01
00:00:00 GMT.

>example:
>972798180000 ==> 10/18/2000 14:08:11

That's not a sensible format for the Internet.  The average American
will want 12-hour clock time, and the rest of the world won't want FFF
date field order.  Convert it to YYYY-MM-DD hh:mm:ss, which is
comprehensible and unambiguous everywhere.

From that number, I get 20000-10-29 05:43:00.  Your value is clearly
wrong, as an even multiple of 10 seconds from 1970.0 should give an even
multiple of 10 seconds in hh:mm:ss notation.

Then, of course, you must add UTC, GMT, or Z; or convert to local civil
time.  The latter is only easy if there was no significant change in the
local Summer Time rules between the date/time in question and the
present moment, except possibly with a combination of Vista and a non-
compliant Javascript implementation.

It's a good idea to read the newsgroup c.l.j and its FAQ.  See below.

--
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