Home     |     .Net Programming    |     cSharp Home    |     Sql Server Home    |     Javascript / Client Side Development     |     Ajax Programming

Ruby on Rails Development     |     Perl Programming     |     C Programming Language     |     C++ Programming     |     IT Jobs

Python Programming Language     |     Laptop Suggestions?    |     TCL Scripting     |     Fortran Programming     |     Scheme Programming Language


 
 
Cervo Technologies
The Right Source to Outsource

MS Dynamics CRM 3.0

Python Programming Language

Getting mount stats for filesystems


Hi, I am trying to find a way to figure out whether a certain remote
filesystem is mounted using tcp vs. udp in Python. I've looked at the
statvfs call and module but they don't give me anything useful (the
F_FLAGS field for both a tcp and a udp filesystem is the same.

I could, of course, get the output of mount and parse that but I would
prefer something more elegant.

Thanks for your help!

--
Mitko Haralanov                                  m@qlogic.com
Senior Software Engineer                             650.934.8064
System Interconnect Group                   http://www.qlogic.com

==========================================
Remember, UNIX spelled backwards is XINU.
                -- Mt.

Mitko Haralanov schrieb:

> Hi, I am trying to find a way to figure out whether a certain remote
> filesystem is mounted using tcp vs. udp in Python. I've looked at the
> statvfs call and module but they don't give me anything useful (the
> F_FLAGS field for both a tcp and a udp filesystem is the same.

> I could, of course, get the output of mount and parse that but I would
> prefer something more elegant.

I'm not quite sure what you want to achieve. You are on machine B,
and you want to find out whether a remote file system (on machine A)
is mounted remotely (say, from machine C)?

How do you answer that question with  mount(8)?

Also, what is a tcp filesystem?

Regards,
Martin

On Tue, 05 Jun 2007 09:19:08 +0200
"Martin v. Lwis" <mar@v.loewis.de> wrote:

> I'm not quite sure what you want to achieve. You are on machine B,
> and you want to find out whether a remote file system (on machine A)
> is mounted remotely (say, from machine C)?

Ok, let me try to explain:

I am on machine A, which has a NFS mounted filesystem hosted on machine
B. All I need to find out is whether the NFS filesystem is mounted
using tcp or udp.

--
Mitko Haralanov                                  m@qlogic.com
Senior Software Engineer                             650.934.8064
System Interconnect Group                   http://www.qlogic.com

==========================================
 Paul: If rubbin' frozen dirt in your crotch is wrong, hey,
 I don't wanna be right.

> I am on machine A, which has a NFS mounted filesystem hosted on machine
> B. All I need to find out is whether the NFS filesystem is mounted
> using tcp or udp.

Ah, ok. I recommend to parse /proc/mounts.

Regards,
Martin

On Tue, 05 Jun 2007 20:14:01 +0200
"Martin v. Lwis" <mar@v.loewis.de> wrote:

> Ah, ok. I recommend to parse /proc/mounts.

I was looking for something that reminded me less of Perl and more of C
but haven't been able to find such a method.

--
Mitko Haralanov                                  m@qlogic.com
Senior Software Engineer                             650.934.8064
System Interconnect Group                   http://www.qlogic.com

==========================================
... A booming voice says, "Wrong, cretin!", and you notice that you
have turned into a pile of dust.

Mitko Haralanov schrieb:

> On Tue, 05 Jun 2007 20:14:01 +0200
> "Martin v. Lwis" <mar@v.loewis.de> wrote:

>> Ah, ok. I recommend to parse /proc/mounts.

> I was looking for something that reminded me less of Perl and more of C
> but haven't been able to find such a method.

You could try to invoke getmntent(3). I'm not aware of a Python wrapper
for it, so you either try to write one yourself in C, or use ctypes to
write it in Python.

Regards,
Martin

On Tue, 05 Jun 2007 21:32:21 +0200
"Martin v. Lwis" <mar@v.loewis.de> wrote:

> You could try to invoke getmntent(3). I'm not aware of a Python wrapper
> for it, so you either try to write one yourself in C, or use ctypes to
> write it in Python.

I am looking at ctypes and it might do what I need but I can't figure
out a way to convert a Python File object to a C FILE pointer (which is
the needed argument for getmntent).

Any ideas?

--
Mitko Haralanov                                  m@qlogic.com
Senior Software Engineer                             650.934.8064
System Interconnect Group                   http://www.qlogic.com

==========================================
 Fry: That clover helped my rat-fink brother steal my dream of going
into space. Now I'll never get there.
 Leela: You went there this morning for donuts.

> I am looking at ctypes and it might do what I need but I can't figure
> out a way to convert a Python File object to a C FILE pointer (which is
> the needed argument for getmntent).

> Any ideas?

I think you are supposed to pass the pointer to getmntent that you
obtained from setmntent (likely asking for read-only access).

Regards,
Martin

Add to del.icio.us | Digg this | Stumble it | Powered by Megasolutions Inc