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How to print this character u'\u20ac' to DOS terminal


Who could explain the follow issue ?

>>> print u' '

>>> print u''

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
UnicodeEncodeError: 'gbk' codec can't encode character u'\x80' in
position 0: il
legal multibyte sequence


or I just put the unicode number
>>> print u'\u0394'

>>> print u'\u20ac'

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
UnicodeEncodeError: 'gbk' codec can't encode character u'\u20ac' in
position 0:
illegal multibyte sequence


My terminal is cmd.exe under windows XP.
what's the different between the two character ? what can I do if I
want to print the u'\u20ac'?
schrieb:

> Who could explain the follow issue ?
>>>> print u'\u0394'
>
>>>> print u'\u20ac'
> Traceback (most recent call last):
>   File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
> UnicodeEncodeError: 'gbk' codec can't encode character u'\u20ac' in
> position 0:
> illegal multibyte sequence

> My terminal is cmd.exe under windows XP.
> what's the different between the two character ? what can I do if I
> want to print the u'\u20ac'?

The problem is that your terminal uses (some form of) the GBK encoding;
see http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/GBK for details on GBK.

It seems that GBK (or, rather, code page 936) supports the delta
character, but not the euro sign.

To change that, you can use "chcp" in your terminal window.
For example, if you do "chcp 850", you should be able to
display the euro sign (but will simultaneously use the ability
to display the letter delta, and the chinese letters).

I don't know whether the terminal supports an UTF-8 code
page; you can try setting the terminal's code page to
65001 (which should be UTF-8).

Regards,
Martin

On 5 30 , 1 23 , "Martin v. Lo"wis" <mar@v.loewis.de> wrote:

Thanks, but it seems not work yet.

----------------------------------------------------
C:\WINDOWS>chcp 850
Active code page: 850

C:\WINDOWS>python
Python 2.5.1 (r251:54863, Apr 18 2007, 08:51:08) [MSC v.1310 32 bit
(Intel)] on
win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.

>>> print u'\u20ac'

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "C:\Python25\lib\encodings\cp850.py", line 12, in encode
    return codecs.charmap_encode(input,errors,encoding_map)
UnicodeEncodeError: 'charmap' codec can't encode character u'\u20ac'
in position
 0: character maps to <undefined>

C:\WINDOWS>chcp 65001
Active code page: 65001

C:\WINDOWS>python
Python 2.5.1 (r251:54863, Apr 18 2007, 08:51:08) [MSC v.1310 32 bit
(Intel)] on
win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.

>>> print u'\u20ac'

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
LookupError: unknown encoding: cp65001
-----------------------------------------------
I find that the u'\u20ac' related 'mbcs' encode is 0x80, I could print
it directly

>>> print '\x80'


But the string contained the u'\u20ac' is get from remote host. Is
there any method to decode it to the local 'mbcs'?
On May 30, 3:05 pm, <kelvin.@gmail.com> wrote:

On May 30, 3:05 pm, <kelvin.@gmail.com> wrote:

forgot to unicode(string) before send it?

??????????????? wrote:
> But the string contained the u'\u20ac' is get from remote host. Is
> there any method to decode it to the local 'mbcs'?

remote_string = u'\u20ac'
try:
   local_string = remote_string.encode('mbcs')
except:
   # no mbcs equivalent available
   print "encoding error"
else:
   # local_string is now an 8-bit string
   print "result:", local_string
   # if console is not mbcs, you should see incorrect result
   assert result == '\x80'

Mbcs is windows-only so I couldn't test this.

If your application handles text, it may be easier to just leave everything
in Unicode and encode to utf-8 for storage?

Regards,
Tijs

On 5 30 , 9 03 , Tijs <tijs_n@artsoftonline.com> wrote:

Yes, it works, thank you.
But I doubt this way may not work on linux.  Maybe I should write some
additional code for supporting both windows and linux OS.

wrote:
> Yes, it works, thank you.
> But I doubt this way may not work on linux.  Maybe I should write some
> additional code for supporting both windows and linux OS.

Depends on what you want to do. Printing to a DOS terminal is hard in
Linux :-) If you write server code, best to keep all text in unicode.

--

Regards,
Tijs

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