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MS Dynamics CRM 3.0

TCL(Tool Command Language) Scripting

dates like clock scan


Clock scan takes in nice human readable dates and times, and converts
them into UNIX. Is there an equivalent in reverse?

e.g.

% set a [clock scan "tomorrow"]
1178875675
% set b [clock_nice $a]
tomorrow
% set a [clock scan "next friday"]
1179442800
% set b [clock_nice $a]
next friday

On May 10, 5:28 am, "alex.@gmail.com" <alex.@gmail.com> wrote:

> Clock scan takes in nice human readable dates and times, and converts
> them into UNIX. Is there an equivalent in reverse?

> e.g.

> % set a [clock scan "tomorrow"]
> 1178875675
> % set b [clock_nice $a]
> tomorrow
> % set a [clock scan "next friday"]
> 1179442800
> % set b [clock_nice $a]
> next friday

The clock format command will take the results of clock scan and turn
it into something like:
Fri May 11 00:00:00 EDT 2007

But I don't know of anything that goes from clock ticks into
conversational dates.

lvir@gmail.com (Larry W. Virden) wrote in
<1178808898.371242.289@e51g2000hsg.googlegroups.com>:

???
(bin) 53 % clock format [clock clicks]
Mon Oct 10 7:06:08 AM GMT Daylight Time 2033
On 10 Mai, 20:04, g@sfuu.ca (Ian Gay) wrote:

> lvir@gmail.com (Larry W. Virden) wrote in
> >But I don't know of anything that goes from clock ticks into
> >conversational dates.

> ???
> (bin) 53 % clock format [clock clicks]
> Mon Oct 10 7:06:08 AM GMT Daylight Time 2033- Zitierten Text ausblenden -

[clock clicks] is not a currency that [clock format] works with
correctly. Time is in seconds, and [clock seconds] delivers the
current tally.

But with "conversational dates", stuff like "yesterday", "tomorrow",
"last Friday" was meant. Should be a simple matter of programming :^)

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